Blogs

Gift Society and Basic Income, Burning Man Documentary

See video

Short documentary on the culture of Burning Man, featuring interviews with Federico Pistono, Lara Edge, Sean Cusack, Mark W Swizee, Dan Harder, Bernhard Popovic, Nino Bino, Andreas Ribarits, and Yasmine Blair.

Directed by: Robert Styblo.
Produced for science program "TM Wissen" for the Austrian channel ServusTV/Red Bull TV.

Check out my project for free education to everyone: http://konozlearning.com
And of course Burning Man: http://burningman.org

Link to the video on YouTube: http://youtu.be/2lSoLjW2NRQ

Science Proves the Existence of God... or Not

science-proves-god-blog.jpg
On Dec. 26, 2014 an opinion piece appeared in the Wall Street Journal titled “Science Increasingly makes the case for God.” As it happens with these things, it went viral. Since then, many rebuttals have been written, including a very detailed article by Ethan Siegel and a letter to the editor by Lawrence Krauss, disputing the WSJ specious science claims. Unfortunately the editors of the WSJ failed to print their response, so I posted them here for your convenience.

I shall refrain from commenting, aside from adapting a quote of the great Douglas Adam:

"I refuse to prove that I exist," says God, "for proof denies faith, and without faith I am nothing."


"But," says man, "[that article in the Wall Street Journal says that science] proves that you exist, and so therefore, by your own arguments, you don't. Q.E.D."


"Oh dear," says God, "I hadn't thought of that," and promptly vanishes in a puff of logic.

Publishing my first novel, "A Tale of Two Futures"

Almost two years in the making. Finally finished my first novel. This is my Christmas present for you.


What will the future look like, and what can you do to change it?

A Tale of Two Futures is a sci-fi young adult novella that tells the story of an average day in life in two very different futures, one where things have gone terribly wrong, and the other where things have gone amazingly right.

The future will either be beautiful beyond imagination; or dismayingly horrifying, much worse than sci-fi dystopias have prepared us for.

The difference between the two futures lies in the choices we make.

Most people think that the world is too big, too immense for any individual to have an impact, because anything we do is merely a drop in the ocean. But what is an ocean, if not a multitude of drops?

Find out more on the book's page: http://federicopistono.org/books/tale2futures

The book is available for Kindle, iBooks, PDF, and ePub. As always, it's published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike license and all files are DRM-free.

How a nerdy kid from nowhere self-published a best-seller and got noticed by Google CEO Larry Page and The Wall Street Journal

Reading time: 12 minutes.

Last week Larry Page, the CEO of one of the largest corporations in the world, and possibly one of the most powerful people on the planet, released an interview with the Financial Times endorsing my work and research on the effect of artificial intelligence and automation in the job market. That's quite remarkable, given that my school teachers told me I had no talent, that I wasn't good at writing, and that I was not even that smart. But let me take a step back.

I was born in a small village near the mountains, on the Italian Alps. There were only two schools, and not very good ones. Like many kids who like to think a lot, obsessively study things they're fascinated about, and dream big, I felt very alienated in such a small, provincial environment. There were a few bullies at school whose fathers were in jail, according to some rumors they were in for murder, some even said mafia. I never checked, I just knew I didn't want to mess with them. It was a pretty harsh environment. For someone like me who wasn't good at football, didn't like football, whose favorite bedtime reading was the CIA World Factbook and whose most beloved show was the French animated science cartoon "Once open a time... [Space, Life, etc...]," life didn't get any easier.

Beside my classmates, with whom I could never relate with but didn't particularly care, the biggest problem was the school itself. The teachers, the academic program, the tests, in my mind everything was wrong. Any interest I had was either considered irrelevant, not part of the standard curriculum and therefore not worthy of my time, or just plain weird. It shouldn't be a surprise that I looked for a way to escape.

First, I began with computers. I started with building websites, I must have been 11 or 12, but when I installed a Debian Linux on my machine I fell in love with system administration and programming. I would obsessively type on the keyboard unix commands all day long, writing scripts, hacking things apart and together, often times until late at night. It was exhilarating and incredibly satisfying. I remember once my mother came to my room to check on me at 4AM. "What are you doing up at this hour!?" she asked, "Coding stuff," I replied. I guess she was expecting me to watch porn. To this day, I still don't know if she was relieved or preoccupied that I wasn't.

If working late at night on my computer and reading books on science, technology, and economics was like drinking from the fountain of youth and wisdom, going to school felt like gulping battery acid from a rusty can. When I finished middle school, one of the teachers told my parents that I would have been better off going to work right away, because I was not smart enough to go to high school. Needless to say, we didn't follow that advice.

What if everybody got free cash? Results from real-world experiments might surprise you

See video

What if everybody received every month enough money to live by? Will society collapse? Will we all become slackers? Myths and facts about Unconditional Basic Income, with analysis from a real world experiment conducted in India between 2011-2013. Keynote speech at the Future of Work Summit, NASA Ames Research Park, California, June 30, 2014.

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vnB16E36EQ
Help subtitle: http://www.amara.org/en/videos/O2C1xKXIE8au/en/798163/

Syndicate content